Logo Logo

Citation: Diefenbach, Sarah and Anders, Laura: The Psychology of Likes: Relevance of Feedback on Instagram and Relationship to Self-esteem and Social Status. 2021. Open Data LMU. 10.5282/ubm/data.244

The Psychology of Likes: Relevance of Feedback on Instagram and Relationship to Self-esteem and Social Status
The Psychology of Likes: Relevance of Feedback on Instagram and Relationship to Self-esteem and Social Status

Social media such as Instagram have become extremely popular and part of many people’s daily routine. At the same time, critics see mental health risks, warning that post can turn into a competition and users become addicted to other users' feedback (e.g., likes, new followers) to boost their self-esteem. In line with such concerns, Instagram recently started an invisible likes test phase in several countries. The present study relates such claims and interventions to the academic literature and empirical research. We refer to existing concepts and models such as impression management, media addiction and the uses and gratification approach, considering subjective feedback relevance as a proxy for individually perceived gratification. As a complement to previous research, which typically examined social media feedback in terms of frequency (e.g., number of likes received), our field study among 255 Instagram users surveyed subjective feedback relevance, i.e., individual differences in how important one considers other users' feedback in the form of likes or other engagement on Instagram. We explored the relationships between subjective feedback relevance and usage behavior and the correlations between these measures and self-esteem and subjective social status. Low self-esteem and low social status were associated with higher feedback relevance; low social status was further correlated with high engagement in many Instagram activities and choosing to have a public profile. Our study's limitations, future research tasks, and practical implications for well-being-oriented media design are discussed.

Social media; Instagram; likes; self-esteem; social status
Diefenbach, Sarah
Anders, Laura
2021

[thumbnail of Dataset Psychology of Likes] Other (Dataset Psychology of Likes)
Dataset_Instagram.sav

55kB

DOI: 10.5282/ubm/data.244

No license should be granted for this record.

Abstract

Social media such as Instagram have become extremely popular and part of many people’s daily routine. At the same time, critics see mental health risks, warning that post can turn into a competition and users become addicted to other users' feedback (e.g., likes, new followers) to boost their self-esteem. In line with such concerns, Instagram recently started an invisible likes test phase in several countries. The present study relates such claims and interventions to the academic literature and empirical research. We refer to existing concepts and models such as impression management, media addiction and the uses and gratification approach, considering subjective feedback relevance as a proxy for individually perceived gratification. As a complement to previous research, which typically examined social media feedback in terms of frequency (e.g., number of likes received), our field study among 255 Instagram users surveyed subjective feedback relevance, i.e., individual differences in how important one considers other users' feedback in the form of likes or other engagement on Instagram. We explored the relationships between subjective feedback relevance and usage behavior and the correlations between these measures and self-esteem and subjective social status. Low self-esteem and low social status were associated with higher feedback relevance; low social status was further correlated with high engagement in many Instagram activities and choosing to have a public profile. Our study's limitations, future research tasks, and practical implications for well-being-oriented media design are discussed.

Keywords

Social media; Instagram; likes; self-esteem; social status

Source

Diefenbach, S. & Anders, L. (2021). The Psychology of Likes: Relevance of Feedback on Instagram and Relationship to Self-esteem and Social Status. Psychology of Popular Media

Item Type:Data
Contact Person:Diefenbach, Sarah
E-Mail of Contact:sarah.diefenbach at lmu.de
Subjects:Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences
Dewey Decimal Classification:100 Philosophy and Psychology
100 Philosophy and Psychology > 150 Psychology
ID Code:244
Deposited By: Prof. Sarah Diefenbach
Deposited On:12. Jul 2021 08:00
Last Modified:12. Jul 2021 08:01

Repository Staff Only: item control page